Complex Sounds

S impuraIn Italian, consonants can be divided into pure and impure sounds (or simple and complex sounds). While both types can occur anywhere in a word, they only really matter, grammatically speaking, at the beginning of masculine nouns.

Definite Article

Italian definite articlesThe Italian definite article (il, lo, la, i, gli, le) indicates either a particular noun or, contrarily, the general sense of a noun.

   

Indefinite Article

Italian indefinite articlesThe aptly named indefinite article (un, uno, una, dei, degli, delle) indicates an unspecific or unidentified noun.

   

Partitive Article

Italian partitive articlesThe partitive article (del, dello, della, dei, degli, delle) refers to an unspecified quantity of food, liquid, or some other uncountable noun. English has no equivalent article – the partitive is usually translated by the adjectives “some” or “any,” or may be left out entirely.

   

Possessive Adjectives

Italian possessive adjectivesItalian possessive adjectives are used in front of nouns to indicate to whom or to what those nouns belong. They are considerably more complicated than English possessive adjectives because Italian has many different forms depending on the gender and number of the possessed noun.